Big Dreams & Crying Over a Picture Book

Untitled design (19)I believe in big dreams. I believe God gives us these big dreams for a reason. I also believe that no one has the right to tell you that your dreams are too big. No one. Not even yourself.

Our family dreams. We encourage our children to dream. Then we make solid plans and create steps to make those dreams become reality. A little while ago, I wrote about a time when my oldest daughter was told her dream was just a wish that would not come true. (You can read it here.) Her big, bold, beautiful dream. But her dream wasn’t crushed. My strong girl stood up for her dream and said it was a reality that was coming true! (A side note to you mommas: You’re kiddos are listening, so keep pouring God’s truth into them!!!) I was so proud of her boldness, and conviction and unwavering faith.

Fast forward to my weekend at RISE in Los Angeles. Day one we talked about our past. Day two we talked about our future. Our bold dreams. Steps on how to get there and to keep growing and how to not give up on your dreams. How to actually achieve a goal. And then Rachel Hollis sat in a chair, and pulled out a children’s book she reads to her children.

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And. I. Lost. It.

I was crying on page one of this book, because all I could think of was my beautiful children and their beautiful dreams, and the people who tell them their dreams are not possible. The story was about Rosie Revere, but could have just as easily been about my children.

Rosie 2Rosie Revere was an engineer who had big dreams and loved to turn trash into treasure. She was always creating and inventing, but she kept her creations hidden. She kept them hidden, because at one point in her creative life, she was laughed at. Her invention, her dream was laughed at.

 

“I love it,” Fred hooted. “Oh, I truly I do.”But Rosie Revere know that could not be ture. She stuck the cheese hat on the back of her shelf and after that day kept her dreams to herself.

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She stopped making inventions until on day, her Great-Great-Aunt Rose came to visit. Great-Great-Aunt-Rose had big dreams herself and shared them with Rosie. Her biggest dream that she hadn’t accomplished in her life was to fly.

Rosie couldn’t sleep that night because she wanted to help her aunt fly. She was an engineer and she was going to figure it out. She worked very hard, not knowing if her invention would work. The next morning she got into her bold invention to give it a try, but sadly it crashed to the ground.

Then Rosie heard that familiar laugher. The one that made her put her dreams away. Once again, Rosie told herself that she would never be a great engineer. (Cue more tears!) She turned to see that it was her Great-Great-Aunt Rose, who pulled her into a tight hug and said:

“You did it! Hooray! It’s the perfect first try! This great flop is over. It’s time for the next!”

Young Rosie was baffled, embarrassed, perplexed. “I failed,” said dear Rosie. “It’s just made of trash. Didn’t you see it? The cheese-copter crashed.”

“Yes!” said her great aunt. “It crashed. That is true. But first it did just what it needed to do. Before it crashed, Rosie . . . before that . . . it flew!”

Great-Great-Aunt Rose knew that sometimes our dreams and inventions won’t work the first time. We will face failure and rejection and some days it will feel like you are swimming upstream in a storm. But as Great-Great-Aunt Rose tells Rosie:

“The only true failure can come if you quit.”

Rose Revere Engineer by Andrea Beaty and Illustrated by David Roberts is a book you need to get today. Order it from Amazon or pick it up at Target. And read it to you children, no matter how young or how old they are. Tell them that their dreams are important, and real, and beautiful . . . and possible!

God places these bold and beautiful dreams in our souls for a reason. He wants you to live them. Breathe into them. Bring them to life. Then surround yourself with a community, a tribe, that will support you and pray for you and pick you up when you hit a roadbump. Because like Great-Great-Aunt Rose said, “The only true failure can come if you quit.”

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“Rosie Revere Engineer”

by Andrea Beaty and Illustrated by David Roberts

Abrams Books for Young Readers, New York

 

Also be sure to check out these other books:

“Iggy Peck Architect” and “Ada Twist, Scientist”

Your Dream Is Too Big

Don_t let anyone tell you that your dream is too big!

My daughter was told that her dream was too big. That she couldn’t claim it for herself. It wasn’t a fact. It wasn’t a plan. It wasn’t a decision. It was just a dream, a wish that won’t come true.

You see, my daughter has big, bold and beautiful dreams. All of our children do. Our family dreams and sets goals. We make plans and take the steps to make those dreams a reality. We speak our dreams out loud. We pray about them. We claim them.

No one is allowed to tell us our dreams are too big.

God has created us to dream. To create. To love. His dreams for us are even bigger than our own. Beyond our wildest imagination. Go and be bigger!

You don’t need permission to dream.

Maybe you have forgotten the dreams of your childhood. Or the ambitious dreams of your teenage years. As an adult, revisit those dreams. Make new dreams, write them down and then work for them. Dream again!

Your dreams are worth dreaming!

My strong, smart, beautiful and determined daughter turned around and told them they were wrong. She told them her dream was going to happen because she has a plan. She has a checklist of steps that she is taking so that she is ready to conquer that dream. It’s practical, and wishful, and achievable and perfect. And I know that she will make it happen!

Go claim your dreams!

Writing Your Dreams

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When I was little, I dreamed about being a ballerina, singing on broadway, becoming a lawyer and going to an Ivy League school. These dreams played out in my imagination, my make-believe and even played a role in the decisions I made. My dreams changed as I became a high school student and again when I went off to college (at a wonderful, but non Ivy League university). My dreams were still there, although different, as a young adult, a new wife and as a mother. But, somewhere along the way, I lost sight of those dreams and forgot to make new ones.

As adults, we forget to dream. It’s as if we don’t have permission to dream anymore. I don’t believe that God ever wants us to stop dreaming. God has amazing plans for us and for our future. I still have some amazing, God-given dreams that I am dreaming.

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Last night, I spent some time writing down a dream I have for the future. I put it down on paper and made a plan on how to move towards that dream. I actually numbered my page. I love checklists, but it also gave me a chance to be practical about this dream. Simple, basic, baby-steps to move toward my big, amazing, dream. It was hard and freeing to put it down on paper. It made my dream that I have rarely shared, real. I could see my words right before me in black and white. It became alive.

I am claiming it and praying about it and thanking God for it and MOVING on it! Nothing happens when we just sit on our dreams, and no one has permission to tell you your dreams aren’t good, or worthy, or are too big for your britches. They are yours to dream!

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2018 is my year of “becoming.” You can read more about my one word in my blog post One Word: Become. Claiming my dream is part of it. I’ve been reading some great books that are encouraging me and moving me forward. I encourage you to read them.

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What is your dream? Claim it! Write it down! Make a move, no matter how small, on your dream today!

 

Here are the amazon.com links to the books listed above:

“Girl, wash your face” by Rachel Hollis

“The Dream of You” by Jo Saxton

“100 Days to Brave” by Annie F. Downs